1890’s Riding Corset

My latest project which I completed in just two days! I recently got the book ‘Stays & Corsets’ by Mandy Barrington and decided to test out the patterning process from is with one of the simpler corsets from the book.

The corset pattern is dated to the 1890’s and is based on an existing surviving garment from the era.

This was a simple corset to put together, I had originally intended to make a lining so that the channels would be concealed (as seen in the original) but decided against it *was lazy* and went with good old twill tape channels instead.

Drafting/Construction

The first thing I did was draft a basic block with alterations to make it corset friendly.
1890sRidingCorset3

I then drafted the pattern according to the books instructions.

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And then cut the pattern pieces out.

1890sRidingCorset7

The patterns were then pinned to my cotton coutil following grain and a seam allowance of 1cm was added to internal seams while 2cm was added to CF and CB to allow for a busk and eyelet facing.

1890sRidingCorset14

When the patterns were cut out I transferred boning channel lines over with carbon paper for ease of identification.

The patterns were sewn together with the 1cm seam allowances and twill tape were pinned over the boning channel indicators.

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This was then sewn down.

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Facings were then made up for the CF and CB.
The CF facing was sewn to allow for the loop side and the hook side.
The CB facing was sewn to bulk up the eyelet area (prevents tearing) and to allow for a concealed boning channel opposite the twill channel with the eyelets running down the centre of the two.

The busk was then sewn in (this busk is from my first corset which is why some paint is missing from it with wear and tear).

1890sridingcorset5.jpg

Bias tape was sewn onto the right side of the corset at both edges. And was then slip stitched into place on the wrong side.

1890sridingcorset11.jpg

13 eyelets were marked evenly either side of the CB down the eyelet channel.

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Each eyelet was punched and hand sewn.
I’ve hand sewn well over 100 eyelets for costumes now and have managed hone the skill down to roughly 10 minutes each, which I quite proud of considering it took me twice as long when I first started!

1890sRidingCorset

And with the eyelets finished so was the corset!

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Here’s a picture of the original surviving corset the pattern is from.

1890sridingcorset1.jpg

 


 

Issues/improvements

Overall I’m quite pleased with the construction, my issues come from the fit.

As far as I’m aware I followed the books instructions to the T, at no point was I confused, it was a very simple process for me. Both drafting the pattern and constructing the corset itself. However, the corset only takes my waist in by half and inch where according to the pattern it should be taking me in by 3 inches.

My other issue with the fit is the bottom of CF, it doesn’t sit flush to me and there’s and abundance of extra fabric there which is visible in photos. It should be tight and it’s not, there’s so much extra fabric that it’s so loose the bottom hook of the busk keeps coming undone. It is however an easy fix, I can alter the bottom edge with a dart and bring the extra fabric in.

I think where I went wrong was in the block draft so I will be drafting a new block for future corsets from this book and see if that resolves the issues. 

Final thoughts

It’s a good corset but it’s too big for me and doesn’t give the reduction I’m after. I plan on making a wasp waist corset from the same book and will be drafting a new block for it.

Overall I made this corset to try out the book and it’s drafting methods. Which even with the result I got I do quite like. And it’s given me a good insight into flat patterning corsets on a block.


 

Has anyone else drafted this corset or used this book? Are there any secrets I’m not wear of?
Feedback is always welcome!

Thanks for reading,
-Nivera

 

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